Abstract Expressionism article reflection

I thought that the most interesting portion of this article was the section titled “Strategies of self-expression.” I wish that they would have gone into detail about a few other artist, but I do think that Jackson Pollock is an interesting case study. Throughout the article you learn a little bit about Jackson Pollock’s mental health. Having that bit of knowledge intensifies your understanding of his process. Abstract expressionism was about personal expression. His work is clearly chaotic, but also balances that chaos out with a sort of visual poetry. You can get lots in the work, so when you think about the ideals of the movement, you are really getting lost in Pollock’s mental creation. The works should essentially be an exact replica of his emotions because his action style of painting involves a reactionary process where he his constantly “dancing” with the painting. There is a passage at the end of the section that reads, “Pollock was less interested in manufacturing lasting aesthetic masterworks than in performing acts, or rituals, by which he aimed to express-and heal- himself.” I think that there is something very romantic about that statement. You learn that Pollock believed that primitive art provided direct links to the unconscious mind. So when you think about the way he went about creating his action paintings, by dripping globs in a  seemingly carelessly manner, across the page, one could make the connection to a monkey doing a painting or a caveman painter. Learning those things about Pollock gives you a greater understanding of his work, and the way his process is connected to the ideals of the Abstract Expressionist movement.

‘The beautiful women’ estimated to be sold for 30/40 milllion

Roy Lichtenstein is an iconic painter from the pop art movement. His comic book series of paintings are his most well known works. Arguably the most iconic painting of the series, is estimated to sell for up to 40 million dollars. Personally I am not a huge fan of work from the pop art movement. However, if I did have that kind of money to spend on a painting (a pop art painting) this one would be on my list. I really love the scale and composition of the work. The large scale lets you enter the painting, a lot like a Pollock painting, and get lost in the shapes from a close distance. At a farther distance you can appreciate the work for its imagery and application style. You can get lost in this painting every time you look at it, which is something that I look for when I buy art work. I can not imagine having that kind of money to spend on a single work, I actually can not even imagine having 40 million dollars to begin with. I look at 40 million dollars as the value of this work, rather than the price. 40 million dollars for a painting seems crazy! But when you account for its social, historical, and cultural value inside the art world, you can start to tally up the dollars. I also believe there is some sort of status or pride gained for owning a work like this, and people with that kind of money have no problem purchasing an object that could potentially elevate their social status. Contemporary art deals with art work as a commodity, they can do this for the most part because ideally the artist is still living and creating works, or is recently deceased and has already made an impact with their work. So when an artists starts selling their work for large amounts of money, they automatically become historically important because once one person has a bit of history, others want in on that as well. I do not know too much about the art market so maybe what I am saying is completely off. But in my opinion that is what happened to Jean Michel Basquiat. His work became a commodity, maybe more so when he was living and could keep producing work. It is just interesting to think about contemporary art and its connection to capitalism through the art market.

Ed Rushca- On the Road.

Bryce Johnson

ARTH 3539

Ed Ruscha: On the Road

Exhibition review

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Bryce Johnson- Lesley Flanigan review

Bryce Johnson

Visiting Artist Lecture: Lesley Flanigan

ARTH 3539

April 24, 2012

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Bryce Johnson-Janine Antoni lecture review

Artist Lecture Review: Janine Antoni

Bryce Johnson

ARTH 3539-001

Janine Antoni is a Bahaman’s born artist, who currently lives and works in New York. She received her education from Sarah Lawrence College in New York, with a BA, and from Rhode Island School of Design, with an MFA. She deals with process in her work with relation to her body in a certain environment, or doing a certain action. Janine uses her mouth and hair as a process of communicating her narrative in her works.  Performance is an important aspect of Janine’s work. Her process a lot of the time includes some sort of performance, as seen her piece “Gnaw.” Her work has a surface value that is interesting but her pieces also have a deeper meaning that normally communicate her views of the everyday world and how we interact with it.

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Clyfford Still paper by Bryce Johnson

Bryce Johnson

Clyfford Still Paper

After walking walk out of the Clyfford Still Museum, you realize that what you have experienced is like nothing you have seen or felt before. A museum that is dedicated to the work of one artist, allows the opportunity to create a space that has no distractions, no works are competing against each other for the viewers’ attention. This is how the Still Museum is set up. The opportunity to have my first exposure to Clyfford Still’s work in the manner that I did, allowed me to experience the work as he and other abstract expressionist wanted the work to be felt.

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Bryce Johnson Intellectual Profile

1.I am a junior in the BFA program. Most of my work and my interest is more graphic design based, however I enjoy all forms of expression. Photography is the foundation for my ideas about composition, and is a big influence in my design work.

2. One exhibition that I found impressive was Andrea Carlson’s VORE, which I saw in Minneapolis Minnesota. Her works are object based, set in a dreamy landscape. The larger works were very powerful in the way that they are very visually active and also in the way that they provoke very real emotion. Andrea’s work also appeals to me because it appears to be done with more of graphic quality, rather than a painterly quality.

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Bryce Johnson on Terry Smith article

Terry Smith starts his article off my asking what is contemporary art. He gives a brief history of art movements that happened before the contemporary art movement, movements that contemporary art is a response to.  Smith argues the idea that contemporary art is not really am art movement or an “ism.” but rather an ongoing state of being for present day artists. The basic definition of the word is the “contemporary” he aslo agues states the obvious that contemporary art is art of the present and future.

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