Extra Credit

I was really excited to go into Tuesday’s lecture on Middle Eastern Art

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Nao Bustamante (Visiting Artist Lecture Review)

Rocio Ramirez
ART 3539
Visiting Artist Lecture (Nao Bustamante)

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Exhibition Paper – Denver Art Museum

Rocio Ramirez
ARTH 3539
Paper on Exhibition (Denver Art Museum)
Ed Ruscha: On the Road Exhibition

The Ed Ruscha exhibition, “On the Road” named for its focus on the 1957 Jack Kerouac novel was presented in the Denver Art Museum, and has been for the past several months. It not only fulfilled one of the requirements of the class, but also intrigued me, for both the artist at work, Ed Ruscha, and the novel, On the Road. Many said this pairing was effortlessly cohesive, for both artist and writer seemed connected through their choice of work, most notably with their deep interest in the American west.

 

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Aki Sasamoto (Visiting Artist Lecture)

Rocio Ramirez

ARTH 3539

Visiting Artist Review

 
Aki Sasamoto is known in the art world as a sculptor, performance artist, installation artist, and many more appellations that are both diverse and somehow coalescent with one another. Sasamoto’s presentation for the CU Visiting Artist Program was threaded with humor, anecdotes, explications, and an underlying message of simplicity within complicated universal messages.

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Comments on Gerhard Richter

A lot of the art and movements that we’ve looked at in this class so far have been in some way moving away

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Clyfford Still Paper- Rocio Ramirez

Rocio Ramirez
ARTH 3539
22 Jan 2012
Clyfford Still Paper

 

The Clyfford Still museum located in the core of Denver’s art district is home, to obviously, some of the many Clyfford Still masterpieces. The work spans from pieces such as his imposing self portrait painted in 1940, to his more representational paintings like PH-77 done in 1936, all the way to his more abstract expressionist pieces like PH-129 done in 1949. This spectacular museum is structured in a opposing dualistic way, in that it encapsulates both timelessness and a sense of avant-garde, which perfectly sums up Clyfford Still as an artist.
The museum is set up in a very deliberate manner, no doubt designed in accordance with the artist it was named after and whose work it houses. The museum is neither extravagant nor unemotional, but rather serves to invite in exploration. Art is something that is seen cynically, and even more so with abstract art, perhaps mostly due to the indirectness of it. But this building serves to message that one must enter open-mindedly, and patiently give time to each and every piece. The interior is open and brightly lit, again echoing the welcoming atmosphere introduced by the exterior architecture. The white-gray walls and circular patterned ceiling create a pragmatic layout, both appealing to a regular museum patron and the occasional attendant. Then it begins, one slowly meanders through the Clyfford Still museum, quickly loosing track of time.

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Rocio Ramirez

1. Right now I’m a studio arts major, but I plan to transfer into the School of Architecture and Planning at the beginning of next year or in the summer. I hope to major in Architecture and minor in Fine Arts. I’ve been interested in pursuing a profession in the architecture field since about 6th grade, and the more I tried out other subjects to see if there was more interest in another field, the more it reinforced my love and confidence in the architecture world. Some of my other interests include drawing, reading, travelling, and going to the movies. Film is something that I’m really passionate about too. So much so, that I briefly considered minoring in film studies. Travelling is also something I love and would like to do more of. Especially to the less visited areas, those seem to interest me the most. For example I would really want  to visit Scotland, Romania, Iceland, Sweden, Toronto, Montreal (which I hope to visit this summer), Argentina, and Nova Scotia.

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Smith Paragraph

Terry Smith’s, “What is Contemporary Art?” begins with specifically addressing the term “Contemporary Art.” Smith then explicates what the term entails, in the form of what structures and formulates the initially vague and ambiguous appellation. It’s then furthered by the assessment that contemporary art is forever changing, as well as, something that will be forever present. Using the Vernissage, Artforum, and the Guggenheim as recognizable exhibitions, magazines, and museums to provide specificity of the commonality and presence it’s taken in our daily lives. This awareness of it in humanity’s collective conscious then goes on to help refine what contemporary art is. Smith states that contemporary art is what we make, it is what we define it as. This ties back to the earlier point in that its always morphing and branching out into newer forms, techniques, styles, etc. Advancing on that point, Smith then deals with the way contemporary art is and what it means is debated and not concrete. Some may see it as art lacking historical context, in that it’s present. While others see it in a very historical context, in that it deals with what is happening in the world in that specific point in time. Another point that’s brought up is that artists must advertise themselves and their work in order to get an audience, this then leads to the problematic solution that some turn to, which is that they get this “attention” through crass and scandalous ways. But there are those who take the different route by giving their work some symbolic and deeper thought to make a statement about the current issues of the world. Smith states this is more important now than ever, because of our increasingly visual and globalized world.

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