Exhibition Visit: Viviane Le Courtois “Edible?”

Sonya Rivera

ARTH 3539

Exhibition Visit

I attended the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art’s current exhibition, Edible? This piece is the work of Viviane Le Courtois, who has been working with food for twenty-two years. I found it necessary before attending the exhibition to first become acquainted with the artist’s background to perhaps have a better understanding of methods and intentions used in Courtois’s work. Continue reading

Artist Lecture Review: Lawrence Argent

Sonya Rivera

ARTH 3539

Artist Lecture Review

On April 18, I traveled to the Denver Art Museum and attended the Logan Lecture Series featuring Lawrence Argent, which I found to be incredibly enjoyable. After a short introduction, the artist began speaking about his main interests when creating an art piece, which includes materiality. Continue reading

Visiting Scholar Lecture Review: Stephen Campbell

Sonya Rivera

ARTH 3539

Visiting Scholar Lecture Review

I attended the Stephen Campbell lecture Andrea Mantegna: Force and the Frame on April 10. Campbell is a specialist in Italian art of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries with a focus on the artistic culture of North Italian court centers. Continue reading

Clyfford Still by Sonya Rivera

Clyfford Still is generally regarded as a master of his time, specifically a leader and founder of the Abstract Expressionist movement in the United States. Continue reading

Sonya Rivera

1. I am currently a Senior majoring in Architecture, specifically interested in residential architecture. While taking History of Architecture courses, I became more aware of my interest in art history and am working on declaring it as a second major. I hope both fields of study will work well together in order to enhance my future employment and make me a more well-rounded individual.

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Smith Paragraph

Terri Smith’s writing “What is Contemporary Art?” prods deep into the different perspectives concerning what the recent category of art is and will become. The first perspective explained is that the art form is classified as being art historical, with a return and embracement of styles of the past. This also ties in with the post historical idea, insisting that the past, specifically Modernism, is the ultimate guide to the work of Contemporary artists. Periodlessness is introduced, being both extremely troubling to some and a relief to others. This thought consists of an end to any artistic period, instead resulting in the end of any original art to be reflected on in the future. Smith, as well as others introduced in the writing, is concerned that artists of today are driven merely on attention and self-promotion than leaving a mark on art history, and could perhaps result in such an ending. Peter Timms explains a “trickster effect,” one which involves artists acting as elitists that look down on those who question the motives or validity of their art.

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