Suki Nesvig: “It’s better to burn out than to fade away.”

I visited the Denver Museum of Contemporary Art and explored their punk rock exhibit.

Bruce Conner and the Primal Scene of Punk Rock  made me want to explore this era of punk rock more in depth.

Exhibition Paper

Suki Nesvig: Lesley Flanigan Lecture Review

I thought that Lesley Flanigam was pretty brilliant. Read more about her lecture below!!!

love,

Suki

Flanigan

 

Suki Nesvig, Summary of Worldwide Women

Here is my summary of the article “Worldwide Women” by Eleanor Heartney. I found the art in the article to be extremely interesting, and powerful. Overall I though the author was over critical of the show, but I feel that a show of this magnitude is a challenge to curate and I think the curators made some good and bad decisions.

Worldwide Women

Suki Nesvig: Aki Sasamoto Visiting Artist

This is a performer to say the least. Who can find the Tink!?

Aki

 

Clyfford Still Paper, Suki Nesvig

 

 

Clyfford Still Paper

 

SMITH POST.. FOUND IN DRAFTS!!!????

I found my Smith post in my drafts, and I am not sure if it was actually posted to the blog. Here are my paragraphs just incase it wasn’t posted..

Smith started by posing many questions to the reader, and attempting to pry and pick at some answers. Contemporary art can be looked at starting from the 1980’s but the real period starts in the 1990’s. Smith also argues that one could look at art from earlier and say that it is contemporary. In the 1990’s there were many museums dedicated to contemporary art, 90 or so. Contemporary art has become its own subculture. It is very trend setting, and a lot of the artists think of them selves as above pop culture, or other norms. Smith talks about the transition from modern to postmodern and then to contemporary. Postmodern was the balancing point between the two periods. Contemporary art is the first real period to come after postmodern. A lot of the art made int the 70’s or 80’s does not fit into a period. Smith talks about how Contemporary Art is “beyond history” or “after the end of history.” It is a surrendering of art to the present times. Continue reading

Intellectual Profile

1. I study Art History, and I am specifically in love with Mesoamerican and Pre-Columbian art. Specifically the Aztecs, Olmec, Inca, and Mayan art works. I find Mesoamerican art the most fascinating because we know so little about it. This also makes it frustrating. The cultures are  so different than today, and this makes the subject matter so interesting. I also am a sucker for Impressionism, but isn’t everyone? Who doesn’t want to stand in the Lingerie in Paris and stare into the paint of Monet’s Water Lilies? I did.

I also love installation art, I strongly believe that installation art and street art are a necessity for every neighborhood in America. Go Banksy, go.
Continue reading

Smith Paragraphs

Smith started by posing many questions to the reader, and attempting to pry and pick at some answers. Contemporary art can be looked at starting from the 1980′s but the real period starts in the 1990′s. Smith also argues that one could look at art from earlier and say that it is contemporary. In the 1990′s there were many museums dedicated to contemporary art, 90 or so. Contemporary art has become its own subculture. It is very trend setting, and a lot of the artists think of them selves as above pop culture, or other norms. Smith talks about the transition from modern to postmodern and then to contemporary. Postmodern was the balancing point between the two periods. Contemporary art is the first real period to come after postmodern. A lot of the art made int the 70′s or 80′s does not fit into a period. Smith talks about how Contemporary Art is “beyond history” or “after the end of history.” It is a surrendering of art to the present times.

Continue reading